Iglika Vassileva

Dyankov Translation Prize, 2016Iglika Vassileva

Iglika Vassileva was awarded first place for her translation of the John  Banville’s 1997 novel The Untouchable. This book, based largely on the life of Englishman Anthony Blunt, tells the story of an art historian who becomes a double agent working for both the Queen and the Kremlin during the height of the Cold War. Iglika Vassileva is a three-time Dyankov Translation Prize winner, having previously she been recognized for her translation of The Sea by John Banville in 2008 and for her translations of J.M. Coetzee’s Diary of a Bad Year and E.L. Doctorow’s Homer and Langely in 2011. Iglika Vassileva has also received much praise for her translations of works by celebrated English-speaking authors such as James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Lawrence Durrell, and Walt Whitman. Read an interview with Iglika Vassileva.

Bistra Andreeva

Dyankov Translation Prize, 2016Bistra Andreeva Bulgaria

Bistra Andreeva was awarded second place for her translation of Stephan Kelman’s Pigeon English. It is the story of Harrison Opoku, an eleven-year old Ghanaian immigrant who, with his best friend, investigates the murder of a boy on the London estate where he lives. Read and interview with Bistra Andreeva.

Fulbright Legacy Lectures, 2016

Michaell Ignatieff

The sixth annual Fulbright Legacy Lectures were given by Michael Ignatieff, the former leader of the Liberal Party of Canada and the current Edward R. Murrow Professor at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He spoke at Edinburgh University on June 6, at King’s College London on June 8 and at Pembroke College, Oxford on June 10, 2016.

Through his lectures on the European refugee crisis, Professor Ignatieff addressed the rise of a new political narrative that influences European attitudes and policies towards migrants and refugees. Since the end of the Cold War, an optimistic narrative built upon beliefs in an united Europe and the possibility for partnerships between the developing and developed worlds has reigned. However, recent developments in Europe have seen the rise of a new narrative, in which the nation is valued above international cooperation and which stresses the potential danger of outsiders. Throughout his three lecture series, Professor Ignatieff delved into this shift in narratives and explored more optimistic approaches to refugee crisis.

Tilly De Groot

Gill Jacot-Guillarmod Award, 2016

Tilly De Groot, of the U.S. Embassy The Hague, received this award in recognition of a long career of achievements, including: the creation of American Studies degree programs at five top universities; the establishment, staffing and programming of the John Adams Institute; and work with Dutch Muslim and immigrant communities. Two of de Groot’s programs have been showcased by the U.S. State Department as “global best practices.”

Gladys Tutisani

Gill Jacot‐Guillarmod Award Honorable Mention, 2016

Gladys Tutisani, of the U.S. Embassy in Harare, Zimbabwe, received recognition for her unusually effective programming; her persuasive exchange nominations; her ability to strategically innovate and expand cultural programming; and her willingness to jump into staffing gaps and mentor new officers. In response to her outstanding nomination, we have resolved to start offering a cash award to Honorable Mentions for the Gill Jacot-Guillarmod Award.

Rick Ruth

Ilchman-Richardson Award, 2016

Rick’s expertise and deep commitment to excellence in the conduct of cultural and public diplomacy have inspired countless ECA and State Department colleagues. Through a career spanning four decades, he has always focused on relationships with people—predicated on the respectful exchange of ideas and experiences, and reflecting the founding premise and highest aspirations of US cultural diplomacy.

David Edginton

Lois Roth Award, 2016

Through his work in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Edginton has inspired countless colleagues and transformed staff roles. He has energized the U.S. Embassy’s engagement with youth and women and brought innovations to its arts and education programs. Demonstrating Lois Roth’s knack for finding audiences where they live, David also created a series of cartoon YouTube videos to promote studying in the U.S. These became the most-watched State Department videos in history.

Maureen Freely & Alexander Dawes

MLA-Roth Award, 2016

The Time Regualtion Institute

Maureen Freely and Alexander Dawes won the MLA-Roth Award for their spectacular translation of The Time Regulation Institute (Penguin, 2014), by Ahmet Hamdi Tanpinar, which describes the misadventures of the antihero Hayri Irdal, as tradition meets modernity in early 20th-century Turkey. In the words of Nobel Laureate Orhan Pamuk, “Ahmet Hamdi Tanpinar is undoubtedly the most remarkable author in modern Turkish literature. With The Time Regulation Institute, this great writer has created an allegorical masterpiece, which makes Turkey’s attempts to westernize and its delayed modernity understandable in all its human ramifications.”

Robert Chandler & Elizabeth Chandler

MLA-Roth Award Honorable Mention, 2016

Robert Chandler and Elizabeth Chandler received recognition for their translation of The Captain’s Daughter, by Alexander Pushkin (New York Book Review Books, 2014).

Aaron Poochigian

MLA-Roth Award Honorable Mention, 2016

Aaron Poochigian received recognition for his translation of Jason and the Argonauts, by Apollonius of Rhodes (Penguin, 2014).